Granite: Composition and Properties

Granite, has been in use over the decades, maybe even centuries. The is evidence of granite in use during pre-historic period as well as the popular modern era use in architecture and construction. Here we analyse what granite is, its composition, and physical properties, and examine the few different uses of granite. Granite is a common type of felsic intrusive igneous rock that is granular and phaneritic in texture. The word “granite” comes from the Latin granum, a grain, in reference to the coarse-grained structure of such a crystalline rock. The term granite also applies to a group of intrusive igneous rocks with similar textures and slight variations on composition and origin. These rocks mainly consist of feldspar, quartz, mica, and amphibole minerals, which form interlocking, somewhat equigranular matrix of feldspar and quartz with scattered darker biotite mica and amphibole (often hornblende) peppering the lighter color minerals. Granites can be predominantly white, pink, or gray in color, depending on their mineralogy. By definition, granite is an igneous rock with at least 20% quartz and up to 65% alkali feldspar by volume. Granite is nearly always massive (lacking any internal structures), hard and tough, and therefore it has gained widespread use throughout human history, and more recently as a construction stone. The average density of granite is between 2.65 and 2.75 g/cm3, Melting temperature of dry granite at ambient pressure is or 1215–1260 °C (2219–2300 °F); it is strongly reduced in the presence of water, down to 650 °C at a few kBar pressure. Granite has poor primary permeability, but strong secondary permeability. Composition of granite Here is the chemical...
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