Stonehenge: Facts and History

Stonehenge is a prehistoric monument located in Wiltshire, England. One of the most famous sites in the world, Stonehenge is the remains of a ring of standing stones set within earthworks. It is in the middle of the most dense complex of Neolithic and Bronze Age monuments in England, including several hundred burial mounds. History of Stonehenge Stonehenge evolved in several construction phases spanning at least 1,500 years. There is evidence of large-scale construction on and around the monument that perhaps extends the landscape’s time frame to 6,500 years. Dating and understanding the various phases of activity is complicated by disturbance of the natural chalk by periglacial effects and animal burrowing, poor quality early excavation records, and a lack of accurate, scientifically verified dates. From what scientists can tell, Salisbury Plain was considered to be a sacred area long before Stonehenge itself was constructed. As early as 10,500 years ago, three large pine posts, which were totem poles of sorts, were erected at the site. Hunting played an important role in the area. Recently researchers uncovered roughly 350 animal bones and 12,500 flint tools or fragments, just a mile away from Stonehenge, the finds dating from 7500 B.C. to 4700 B.C. The presence of abundant game may have led people to consider the area sacred. Recently researchers have also discovered a massive wooden building, which may have been used for burial rituals. Also, dozens of burial mounds have been discovered near Stonehenge indicating that hundreds, if not thousands, of people were buried there in ancient times. At least 17 shrines, some in the shape of a circle, have also...

Germany: 10 Beautiful Monuments Worth Seeing

Germany is probably the least understood among the European countries. After the reunification of Germany, there has been a significant transformation, making it a very interesting tourist destination. Berlin is by far, the most visited city of Germany. There are also other cities which boast of a rich cultural heritage, worth visiting. Here we put together a list of historical monuments and buildings in Germany that we think, you should see. 10 Holstentor The Holstentor is one of the two remaining city gates of the city of Lübeck. Built in 1464, the gate now serves as a museum. Because of its two captivating round towers and arched entrance it is regarded as a symbol of Lübeck. Together with the old city center (Altstadt) of Lübeck it is one of the top tourist attractions in Germany. 9 Cologne Cathedral Easily the greatest Gothic cathedral in Germany, Cologne Cathedral (Kölner Dom) has been Cologne’s most famous landmark for centuries. Construction of the Cologne Cathedral began in 1248 and took, with interruptions, more than 600 years to complete. It is dedicated to the saints Peter and Mary and is the seat of the Catholic Archbishop of Cologne. 8 Dresden Frauenkirche The Dresden Frauenkirche (Church of Our Lady) is a Lutheran church in Dresden, the capital of the German state of Saxony. Built in the 18th century, the church was destroyed in the bombing of Dresden during World War II. The remaining ruins were left as a war memorial, following decisions of local East German leaders. The church was rebuilt after the reunification of Germany, starting in 1994. The reconstruction of its exterior...

10 Monuments Destroyed by War

War in itself is a very destructive force. The magnificence of many a building may vanish over the drop of artillery or gunfire. Many instances of buildings and monuments being protected/camouflaged to evade the wrath of war have been witnessed. The notable one being the Taj Mahal being engulfed in scaffold, to be inconspicuous to bombing aircrafts. Here we put together a list of monuments destroyed by war which highlight the wrath of war on history, and the loss of heritage monuments in light of the same, some as recent as 2015. #10 Apamea, Syria Apamea, the ancient “Treasure City,” sits on the bank of Syria’s Orontes River. It was once home to the kings of the Seleucid Empire, and it later housed the Romans, growing to a population of 500,000. More than a millennium later, it rose again, now as a base during the Crusades. Its magnificent paved streets, beautiful mosaics, and bright white columns carved with intricate designs were a sight to behold. Its long history made it one of the Middle East’s most important archaeological sites. During the current conflict in Syria, Apamea has been damaged to such an extent that many historians believe it can never be restored. Not only has Apamea been devastated by bombing, there have also been those who have taken advantage of the chaos by ransacking the ancient city, looting its treasures. The site now lies ravaged, its columns broken and its mosaics smashed. #9 The Buddhas of Bamiyan, Afghanistan The Buddhas of Bamiyan were two 6th-century monumental statues of standing buddha carved into the side of a cliff in the...
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